Student’s Name
Institutional Affiliation
Date
 
 
Girls, Women, and Popular Culture
Commercial advertisements often objectify women as a way to sell their products. Women objectification typically involves women being portrayed as sexual objects rather than subjects that have values and dignity to fulfill the men’s desires (Zimmerman, & Dahlberg, 2008). For instance, a wide range of commercial ads use women who seem to be perfect in terms of their physical appearance and it is assumed that by doing so, men are more likely to purchase those products. As a result, this women objectification has led into the sexualization of the popular culture whereby men measure women’s beauty based on their physical looks and sexiness. On the other hand, women tend to do anything they can to conform to the dictates of what the ‘ideal beauty’ is as they see in the images presented in the commercial ads so that they can be desired by men. This paper will delve deeper into how women objectification has led to the sexualization of culture.
To start with, the message that most of the advertisements containing women’s images send to the society, both men and women is that what matters more in a woman is their physical appearance above anything else as opposed to men. What is more, that physical appearance should be in a particular way and it is to please men. As such, women who appear the most in the commercial advertisements seem young, slender, with long hair, light skinned, have a perfect face, and above all, have exposed their body parts and pose in a sexual manner. The great emphasis on such looks influences men and they tend to believe that they should be attracted to a woman who looks like that and any girl or lady that does not have those features should be avoided.
For example, image number 12 is an advertisement for Nissan Leaf, which is an electric toy and it has incorporated the image of a woman who does not only appear to be real but she is also nude, emphasizing on the sexualization. What many people do not realize is that the images of women who appear in these ads are often photoshopped to look perfect. For example, the face of the woman in image 12 does not have any wrinkles; it appears as smooth as that of a baby but this is far from reality as she is an adult so she is most likely to have few if not many pimples. This creates to men the impression that a lady who is not light and smooth-skinned, slim, and long-haired is not worthy to be with. Men, therefore, tend to scrutinize women’s body first to know whether they want to be with them or not instead of knowing their personality, values and the likes.
Since all women, on the other hand, want to be desired by men, they end up emulating the women shown as beautiful and sexy from a young age. They, for instance, believe that if they are fat, dark, have short hair, and look old, no man will be attracted to them. This system of beliefs instilled in the popular culture and especially, among women can have detrimental effects. Women who do not meet the set standards of beauty can easily develop low self-esteem (Zimmerman, & Dahlberg, 2008). Women objectification is attributed to the increasing cases of plastic surgeries especially in areas of the body that men find attractive. For instance, a significant number of women today are said to have had implants and surgeries to change the size and the appearances of their breasts to make their husbands or boyfriends comfortable. Come to think of it, women tend to change their body appearances to please men even though it might be uncomfortable for them and without minding what risk it exposes them to. Such actions further support women objectification in relation to the sexualization of culture.
Another way to look at cultural sexualization as a result of women objectification by advertisements is that women consider physical appearances as the only way to succeed in life. Commercial ads often paint a picture of a successful woman as one who seems sexy. In the Western culture, a woman needs to be extremely slim in order to be a model. Therefore, the model often conforms to dieting and deny themselves food so that they can fit in the designer’s clothes as the industry wants them to be (Zimmerman, & Dahlberg, 2008). Women who are fat and plump are often not employed as models and to fit in, they have to cut down their weights. Basically, it can be perceived that sexualization is the only thing that matters in life for both men and women. Women want to be desired by men and therefore, they need to have the standard beauty. Men, on the other hand, see women as sexual objects whose appearances can be changed to look the way they want.
Overall, advertisements objectify women mainly by showing images of women who look perfectly beautiful and sexy for men to desire. This makes men scrutinize women’s bodies more and view women only as sex toys whose nothing else matters but their looks. On the other hand, women tend to do everything they can to meet the standard beauty as that is the only way that men will want them and hence, the cultural sexualization.
 
 
References
Chaudhary, S. (2015). 20 highly sexist print ads that objectify women. Scoopwhoop. Retrieved from www.scoopwhoop.com/inothernews/sexist-advertisements/#.wzo9d8slu
Zimmerman, A., & Dahlberg, J. (2008). The sexual objectification of women in advertising: A contemporary cultural perspective. Journal of Advertising Research48(1), 71-79.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Girls, Women, and Popular Culture
Student’s Name
Institutional Affiliation
Date
 
 
Girls, Women, and Popular Culture
Commercial advertisements often objectify women as a way to sell their products. Women objectification typically involves women being portrayed as sexual objects rather than subjects that have values and dignity to fulfill the men’s desires (Zimmerman, & Dahlberg, 2008). For instance, a wide range of commercial ads use women who seem to be perfect in terms of their physical appearance and it is assumed that by doing so, men are more likely to purchase those products. As a result, this women objectification has led into the sexualization of the popular culture whereby men measure women’s beauty based on their physical looks and sexiness. On the other hand, women tend to do anything they can to conform to the dictates of what the ‘ideal beauty’ is as they see in the images presented in the commercial ads so that they can be desired by men. This paper will delve deeper into how women objectification has led to the sexualization of culture.
To start with, the message that most of the advertisements containing women’s images send to the society, both men and women is that what matters more in a woman is their physical appearance above anything else as opposed to men. What is more, that physical appearance should be in a particular way and it is to please men. As such, women who appear the most in the commercial advertisements seem young, slender, with long hair, light skinned, have a perfect face, and above all, have exposed their body parts and pose in a sexual manner. The great emphasis on such looks influences men and they tend to believe that they should be attracted to a woman who looks like that and any girl or lady that does not have those features should be avoided.
For example, image number 12 is an advertisement for Nissan Leaf, which is an electric toy and it has incorporated the image of a woman who does not only appear to be real but she is also nude, emphasizing on the sexualization. What many people do not realize is that the images of women who appear in these ads are often photoshopped to look perfect. For example, the face of the woman in image 12 does not have any wrinkles; it appears as smooth as that of a baby but this is far from reality as she is an adult so she is most likely to have few if not many pimples. This creates to men the impression that a lady who is not light and smooth-skinned, slim, and long-haired is not worthy to be with. Men, therefore, tend to scrutinize women’s body first to know whether they want to be with them or not instead of knowing their personality, values and the likes.
Since all women, on the other hand, want to be desired by men, they end up emulating the women shown as beautiful and sexy from a young age. They, for instance, believe that if they are fat, dark, have short hair, and look old, no man will be attracted to them. This system of beliefs instilled in the popular culture and especially, among women can have detrimental effects. Women who do not meet the set standards of beauty can easily develop low self-esteem (Zimmerman, & Dahlberg, 2008). Women objectification is attributed to the increasing cases of plastic surgeries especially in areas of the body that men find attractive. For instance, a significant number of women today are said to have had implants and surgeries to change the size and the appearances of their breasts to make their husbands or boyfriends comfortable. Come to think of it, women tend to change their body appearances to please men even though it might be uncomfortable for them and without minding what risk it exposes them to. Such actions further support women objectification in relation to the sexualization of culture.
Another way to look at cultural sexualization as a result of women objectification by advertisements is that women consider physical appearances as the only way to succeed in life. Commercial ads often paint a picture of a successful woman as one who seems sexy. In the Western culture, a woman needs to be extremely slim in order to be a model. Therefore, the model often conforms to dieting and deny themselves food so that they can fit in the designer’s clothes as the industry wants them to be (Zimmerman, & Dahlberg, 2008). Women who are fat and plump are often not employed as models and to fit in, they have to cut down their weights. Basically, it can be perceived that sexualization is the only thing that matters in life for both men and women. Women want to be desired by men and therefore, they need to have the standard beauty. Men, on the other hand, see women as sexual objects whose appearances can be changed to look the way they want.
Overall, advertisements objectify women mainly by showing images of women who look perfectly beautiful and sexy for men to desire. This makes men scrutinize women’s bodies more and view women only as sex toys whose nothing else matters but their looks. On the other hand, women tend to do everything they can to meet the standard beauty as that is the only way that men will want them and hence, the cultural sexualization.
 
 
References
Chaudhary, S. (2015). 20 highly sexist print ads that objectify women. Scoopwhoop. Retrieved from www.scoopwhoop.com/inothernews/sexist-advertisements/#.wzo9d8slu
Zimmerman, A., & Dahlberg, J. (2008). The sexual objectification of women in advertising: A contemporary cultural perspective. Journal of Advertising Research48(1), 71-79.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Girls, Women, and Popular Culture
Student’s Name
Institutional Affiliation
Date
 
 
Girls, Women, and Popular Culture
Commercial advertisements often objectify women as a way to sell their products. Women objectification typically involves women being portrayed as sexual objects rather than subjects that have values and dignity to fulfill the men’s desires (Zimmerman, & Dahlberg, 2008). For instance, a wide range of commercial ads use women who seem to be perfect in terms of their physical appearance and it is assumed that by doing so, men are more likely to purchase those products. As a result, this women objectification has led into the sexualization of the popular culture whereby men measure women’s beauty based on their physical looks and sexiness. On the other hand, women tend to do anything they can to conform to the dictates of what the ‘ideal beauty’ is as they see in the images presented in the commercial ads so that they can be desired by men. This paper will delve deeper into how women objectification has led to the sexualization of culture.
To start with, the message that most of the advertisements containing women’s images send to the society, both men and women is that what matters more in a woman is their physical appearance above anything else as opposed to men. What is more, that physical appearance should be in a particular way and it is to please men. As such, women who appear the most in the commercial advertisements seem young, slender, with long hair, light skinned, have a perfect face, and above all, have exposed their body parts and pose in a sexual manner. The great emphasis on such looks influences men and they tend to believe that they should be attracted to a woman who looks like that and any girl or lady that does not have those features should be avoided.
For example, image number 12 is an advertisement for Nissan Leaf, which is an electric toy and it has incorporated the image of a woman who does not only appear to be real but she is also nude, emphasizing on the sexualization. What many people do not realize is that the images of women who appear in these ads are often photoshopped to look perfect. For example, the face of the woman in image 12 does not have any wrinkles; it appears as smooth as that of a baby but this is far from reality as she is an adult so she is most likely to have few if not many pimples. This creates to men the impression that a lady who is not light and smooth-skinned, slim, and long-haired is not worthy to be with. Men, therefore, tend to scrutinize women’s body first to know whether they want to be with them or not instead of knowing their personality, values and the likes.
Since all women, on the other hand, want to be desired by men, they end up emulating the women shown as beautiful and sexy from a young age. They, for instance, believe that if they are fat, dark, have short hair, and look old, no man will be attracted to them. This system of beliefs instilled in the popular culture and especially, among women can have detrimental effects. Women who do not meet the set standards of beauty can easily develop low self-esteem (Zimmerman, & Dahlberg, 2008). Women objectification is attributed to the increasing cases of plastic surgeries especially in areas of the body that men find attractive. For instance, a significant number of women today are said to have had implants and surgeries to change the size and the appearances of their breasts to make their husbands or boyfriends comfortable. Come to think of it, women tend to change their body appearances to please men even though it might be uncomfortable for them and without minding what risk it exposes them to. Such actions further support women objectification in relation to the sexualization of culture.
Another way to look at cultural sexualization as a result of women objectification by advertisements is that women consider physical appearances as the only way to succeed in life. Commercial ads often paint a picture of a successful woman as one who seems sexy. In the Western culture, a woman needs to be extremely slim in order to be a model. Therefore, the model often conforms to dieting and deny themselves food so that they can fit in the designer’s clothes as the industry wants them to be (Zimmerman, & Dahlberg, 2008). Women who are fat and plump are often not employed as models and to fit in, they have to cut down their weights. Basically, it can be perceived that sexualization is the only thing that matters in life for both men and women. Women want to be desired by men and therefore, they need to have the standard beauty. Men, on the other hand, see women as sexual objects whose appearances can be changed to look the way they want.
Overall, advertisements objectify women mainly by showing images of women who look perfectly beautiful and sexy for men to desire. This makes men scrutinize women’s bodies more and view women only as sex toys whose nothing else matters but their looks. On the other hand, women tend to do everything they can to meet the standard beauty as that is the only way that men will want them and hence, the cultural sexualization.
 
 
References
Chaudhary, S. (2015). 20 highly sexist print ads that objectify women. Scoopwhoop. Retrieved from www.scoopwhoop.com/inothernews/sexist-advertisements/#.wzo9d8slu
Zimmerman, A., & Dahlberg, J. (2008). The sexual objectification of women in advertising: A contemporary cultural perspective. Journal of Advertising Research48(1), 71-79.