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  1. According to Jared Diamond, What are the “Roots of Inequality” in the Division of
    the World Into ‘Haves’ and ‘Have-Nots?

Jared Diamond espouses that the “root of inequality” is the geographical location of a country and the resources it possesses (Worth). According to Jared, all societies in the world were equally wealthy at one time in history. Unfortunately, global environmental changes made some parts of the world to experience harsh weather conditions that made traditional hunting and gathering inefficient in providing food for households. Regions that were geographically disadvantaged were unable to access adequate resources and skills for their development. Diamond uses New Guinea, which is a poor country, and the US, a wealthy nation, for his analysis.
People in the Middle-East were the first to adopt modern methods of farming, which made them wealthy. Communities in this part of the world cultivated high-yielding wheat and barley crops, which were part of the natural vegetation that grew in this area. Besides the availability of these crops, the Middle East, Africa, Asia, Europe, and South America were the only places in the world that had large domestic animals. In particular, cows, pigs, sheep, and goats were native to the Middle East. Some of the large domestic animals such as cows and donkeys helped in the plowing of farms, which enabled farmers to cultivate larger fields. Since wheat and barley farming do not require a lot of labor, people had enough time to practice other trades such as steel making and construction. Due to excessive farming and destruction of the environment, the region became unproductive and the farmers spread eastwards and westwards to more fertile areas (Worth). Eventually, European farmers spread crop farming and animal husbandry to the USA, which enabled the country to become wealthy.
On the contrary, the type of crops found in New Guinea were unproductive, required a lot of labor, and had a low protein content. Therefore, they could not sustain large communities. Accordingly, most New Guineans were either entirely engaged in farming or in hunting and gathering. The lack of time made them unable to discover new trades such as steel forging, which could have enriched the country. Moreover, New Guinean’s did not get any large domestic animal from the Middle East that could aid them in their farms (Worth). Consequently, their disadvantaged geographical location made them unable to access resources and skills that would have made them wealthy.

  1. ) According to Diamond, What Role has “the Roots of Inequality” Played in the Division of the World Into ‘Haves’ and ‘Have-Nots’ Within Today’s Globalization Processes?

In today’s globalization process, poor country’s such as New Guinea are slowly catching up with their developed counterparts because they are now able to access resources and skills from wealthy countries. In his analysis, Diamond notes that although the USA did not have the resources found in the Middle East and Europe, such as domestic animals, its closeness to the latter enabled it to access them and become wealthy (Worth). In today’s globalization process, all countries have similar opportunities of becoming wealth since resources and skills can easily be transferred to any part of the world.
Due to the inequalities in the world, especially geographical location, only parts of the world that were close to the Middle East, or those that could access their resources and skills became extremely wealthy. As the Middle East became drier, the local farmers migrated eastwards and westwards and transferred their skills and resources to people in these areas (Worth). In today’s globalization process, resources and skills can be easily transferred to far-off places using modern transport systems. Moreover, through technology, there can be quick and affordable means of sharing modern skills with people in remote parts of the world.
In his study, Diamond concludes that the only reason that New Guinea is poor is not the lack of early adoption cultivation like most developed countries, but the unavailability of suitable high-yielding crops and large domestic animals in the country. In fact, he notes that some communities in New Guinea have been cultivating for more than 4000 years. Unfortunately, the type of crops grown in these fields have low yields, require a lot of labor, and have low nutritional content. Therefore, with today’s globalization, poor parts of the world such as New Guinea are slowly becoming wealthier because they now able to access resources and skills that are in other parts of the world.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Works Cited
“Guns Germs and Steel Part 1.”YouTube, uploaded by Worth Ofit, 23 July 2013, www.youtube.com/watch?v=i885hopsw6E.
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“Guns, Germs, and Steel: Episode I: Out of Eden”

  1. According to Jared Diamond, What are the “Roots of Inequality” in the Division of
    the World Into ‘Haves’ and ‘Have-Nots?

Jared Diamond espouses that the “root of inequality” is the geographical location of a country and the resources it possesses (Worth). According to Jared, all societies in the world were equally wealthy at one time in history. Unfortunately, global environmental changes made some parts of the world to experience harsh weather conditions that made traditional hunting and gathering inefficient in providing food for households. Regions that were geographically disadvantaged were unable to access adequate resources and skills for their development. Diamond uses New Guinea, which is a poor country, and the US, a wealthy nation, for his analysis.
People in the Middle-East were the first to adopt modern methods of farming, which made them wealthy. Communities in this part of the world cultivated high-yielding wheat and barley crops, which were part of the natural vegetation that grew in this area. Besides the availability of these crops, the Middle East, Africa, Asia, Europe, and South America were the only places in the world that had large domestic animals. In particular, cows, pigs, sheep, and goats were native to the Middle East. Some of the large domestic animals such as cows and donkeys helped in the plowing of farms, which enabled farmers to cultivate larger fields. Since wheat and barley farming do not require a lot of labor, people had enough time to practice other trades such as steel making and construction. Due to excessive farming and destruction of the environment, the region became unproductive and the farmers spread eastwards and westwards to more fertile areas (Worth). Eventually, European farmers spread crop farming and animal husbandry to the USA, which enabled the country to become wealthy.
On the contrary, the type of crops found in New Guinea were unproductive, required a lot of labor, and had a low protein content. Therefore, they could not sustain large communities. Accordingly, most New Guineans were either entirely engaged in farming or in hunting and gathering. The lack of time made them unable to discover new trades such as steel forging, which could have enriched the country. Moreover, New Guinean’s did not get any large domestic animal from the Middle East that could aid them in their farms (Worth). Consequently, their disadvantaged geographical location made them unable to access resources and skills that would have made them wealthy.

  1. ) According to Diamond, What Role has “the Roots of Inequality” Played in the Division of the World Into ‘Haves’ and ‘Have-Nots’ Within Today’s Globalization Processes?

In today’s globalization process, poor country’s such as New Guinea are slowly catching up with their developed counterparts because they are now able to access resources and skills from wealthy countries. In his analysis, Diamond notes that although the USA did not have the resources found in the Middle East and Europe, such as domestic animals, its closeness to the latter enabled it to access them and become wealthy (Worth). In today’s globalization process, all countries have similar opportunities of becoming wealth since resources and skills can easily be transferred to any part of the world.
Due to the inequalities in the world, especially geographical location, only parts of the world that were close to the Middle East, or those that could access their resources and skills became extremely wealthy. As the Middle East became drier, the local farmers migrated eastwards and westwards and transferred their skills and resources to people in these areas (Worth). In today’s globalization process, resources and skills can be easily transferred to far-off places using modern transport systems. Moreover, through technology, there can be quick and affordable means of sharing modern skills with people in remote parts of the world.
In his study, Diamond concludes that the only reason that New Guinea is poor is not the lack of early adoption cultivation like most developed countries, but the unavailability of suitable high-yielding crops and large domestic animals in the country. In fact, he notes that some communities in New Guinea have been cultivating for more than 4000 years. Unfortunately, the type of crops grown in these fields have low yields, require a lot of labor, and have low nutritional content. Therefore, with today’s globalization, poor parts of the world such as New Guinea are slowly becoming wealthier because they now able to access resources and skills that are in other parts of the world.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Works Cited
“Guns Germs and Steel Part 1.”YouTube, uploaded by Worth Ofit, 23 July 2013, www.youtube.com/watch?v=i885hopsw6E.