Introduction
Generally, having a college degree is very important. As a matter of fact, people who have a college degree are more likely to earn 60% higher as compared to their counterparts, the high school graduates. Additionally, people who have college degrees contribute significantly in the civic realm. They are more likely to have a positive contribution to the betterment of the environment. Additionally, they have a high index of happiness. On the same note, Students who drop out of college, are more likely to incur significantly lower lifetime earnings which means that they will not have the financial capability to buy cars, graduate or even get the chance of being home owners. Reddy (99-101) identifies that most high school students might have the right understanding of all the elements that are needed for college enrollment. Additionally, they might be aware of the reasons why attending college is of importance. Unfortunately, most of these high school students have an unrealistic and under-developed understanding of all the elements that are required to join college. Therefore, there is no substantial support for high school students transitioning to college. Interestingly, even for the nerdy students who qualify for college level courses, they seem to lack skills and academic knowledge at the same time. They seem to be ill-prepared as far as the demands of transitioning to college are concerned.
Thesis Statement: Most high school students don’t have access to support as far as joining college is concerned. This explains the low rates of enrollment in colleges. The low rates of college enrollment, can be fixed by supporting high school students in embracing the best choices as far as the colleges are concerned; creating awareness, recognizing talent and re-organizing the funding of schools. Generally, the support should incorporate teaching high school students to make the best college decisions.
Common Ground
Only a small percentage of students successfully transition from high school to college. For instance, in the state of Chicago, less than 10 percent of all high schools graduates manage to transition to college. Chicago first realized that only 8 percent of high school students managed to transition into colleges. The single biggest challenge facing high school grads who intend to join community colleges is the lack of a financial capability. Interestingly, there is not enough support especially in this realm.
Solution 1
Recognition of talent is an example of a way in which support for high school students intending transitioning to college can be increased. Currently, a group of 30 universities and colleges are taking part in an initiative to recognize talent in the spirit of offering enough support for high school students intending to join college. These institutions, have agreed on the terms of being part and parcel of an initiative, termed as the American Talent initiative. The goal of the initiative being advocating for the increase rate of high school enrollment in the United States. According to Falstein (246), “increasing enrollment in high schools will play a significant role of creating diversity.” Consequently, this diversity will increase the rates of Excellency and eventually offer critical support for high school students in transitioning to college.
Solution 2
Secondly, the schools particularly can offer support by reorganizing their spending. One reason why low-income students fail to join college is because they were never recruited in the first place. Particularly, high Schools need to come up with better ways of recruiting low and middle-income high school students who have the potential to become successful and later join college. According to Kirk and Day (1173-1180), “the high schools have to be better as far as creating awareness in joining college is concerned. A number of high school students lack support because they think that most top colleges will not be interested to admit them.” Additionally, they don’t have the information that the cost can be footed by the same colleges in the form of grants and scholarships. Most importantly, providing financial help is not the only way high school students can be supported in transitioning to college. Support in the form of transitioning to college high school students can also be achieved by creating funds in schools which enable their students to be financed when they qualify. This does not only apply to the schools but also to the colleges. For example, Vassar College, did this in the year 2007, when the institution prioritized budget reduction in repairing buildings in favor of financial aid. Consequently, there was a significant increase in the number of low-income students admitted. As a matter of fact, this was a 9 percent increase as compared to the previous year.
Solution 3
Thirdly, the high school students can be supported in transitioning into college by being advised on how to make better college decisions. For example, when Chicago first realized that only 8 percent of high school students managed to transition into colleges, the state came up with precautionary measures in dealing with this trend. To begin with, education stakeholders in Chicago provided and supported the high school students with crucial insights on all that mattered as far as finding funding for college education was concerned. This incorporated coming up with time for the instructors of these high school students to enlighten the students on the strategies for transitioning to college.
Opposing Argument
The opposing argument to the fact that high school students lack enough support as far as joining College is concerned, is based on the premise that college education is obtained on the basis of merit. In this regard, the smartest students will always have the chance to join college because they have struggled for it. According to Callender (164-186), “this premise is that they’re worth college education because they struggled for it.” Therefore the idea of enough support is highly irrelevant in this realm.
Reflection on the Solutions
The solutions presented by the alternative support for high school students seeking to transition to college are equally effective. Referring to recognition of talent for example, displays a lot of evidence that there are talented high school students who failed to transition to college because they have little exposure on all those talents that they possess. Additionally, they have little knowledge that the talents can enable them Join College. Additionally, recognizing the fact that schools need to come up with a strategy that enables them to your reorganize the manner in which they spend the funds allocated to them for the purpose of creating financing for the needy students who might not be able to afford college is very effective. Currently, low-income students have challenges in paying for their high school as well as high school. Additionally, creating awareness among the high school students is a perfect way of supporting them in transitioning to college. As the popular saying stipulates, lack of information is very dangerous. In this respect most high school students lack this kind of support because they’re not able to make informed decisions. Therefore, the solutions presented above are effective solutions as far as support for high school students transitioning to college are concerned.
Conclusion
In a nutshell, the low rates of college enrollment, can be fixed by supporting high school students in embracing the best choices as far as the colleges are concerned. Additionally, the support should incorporate teaching high school students to make the best college decisions. High schools students can be supported in transitioning to college by creating awareness, setting aside funding for them and recognizing talent.
Works Cited
Boom, Alex. “American Talent Initiative Reaches 100 Schools.” Bloomberg Philanthropies. N.p., 2016. Web. 29 Apr. 2018.
Callender, Claire. “Student Numbers And Funding: Does Robbins Add Up?” Higher Education Quarterly 68.2 (2014): 164-186. Web.
Falstein, Eugene I. “The College Dropout and the Utilization of Talent…” Archives of General Psychiatry 17.2 (1967): 246. Web.
Kirk, Rosalind, and Angelique Day. “Increasing College Access for Youth Aging Out Of Foster Care: Evaluation of a Summer Camp Program for Foster Youth Transitioning From High School to College.” Children and Youth Services Review 33.7 (2011): 1173-1180. Web.
Reddy, Dr. G. Sampath. “Emotional Intelligence among Degree College Students.” Global Journal for Research Analysis 3.1 (2012): 99-101. Web.